Posts in SHOP
SHOP: Mountains vs. Plains Holiday Cards

The holidays can be a great time of year -- full of exhilaration, exciting plans, and welcome surprises. And they can also be bummer-y. The Christmas music is everywhere. The airports are crowded. And the people? They're all grumpy. And so for all the fun and feel-good vibes we expect to get from now until the 25th, there can be an added element of seriousness created by all our hysterical efforts to make things feel WONDERFUL! with a capital W. It's enough to squelch all the good humor and Christmas cheer we work to cultivate. I guess what I'm trying to say is this: that even during this most jubilant month of December, there are times when we just need a good belly-laugh. An LOL. Hell -- even a seldom used ROTFL.

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SHOP: the Foundry Home Goods 

For me, the Foundry Home Goods has been that very sort of special shop since opening in 2012. It is beautiful, yet simple. Accessible, yet aspirational. There is a distinct sort of compassion and care that emanates from the shop which cannot be ignored. There’s usually some sage burning and Ruby -- the requisite chocolate lab shop dog -- will be padding around the floorboards. A busy Saturday at the shop means Anna -- the owner -- will float down the stairs in an ethereal white dress and offer everyone inside a Popsicle --- or a beer. Or both. Depending on their age.

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SHOP: The Wrong Store

I was making my way from Alpine to El Paso and needed a diversion before a long and meditative drive along I-90 through mesquite scrub. This is when I stopped by a church on sleepy West Dallas Street. It's monastic profile was almost entirely obfuscated by clusters of prickly pear cacti and statuesque blue agave. A five-foot tall neon horse shoe stood sentry not far from the entrance. Part bordertown iglesia and tourist trading post, the church belongs to artists Buck Johnston and Camp Bosworth. The two relocated to Marfa on a whim, purchased the abandoned place of worship, and have since turned it into their private residence, studio space, and storefront.

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Shop: Idun

Located on Selby Avenue near the Cathedral Hill neighborhood Idun (pronounced Eee-dun) is manned by Dahlia Brue and stocks a contemporary assortment of minimal, well-made clothing for women. Brue is a keen example of the power of a woman with a hyper-sharp aesthetic. Possessing a true editor's eye, Brue buys for the store and was also responsible the interior's unique design. With lines like YMC, Samuji, and Rachel Comey represented, the shop is unique for it's playful brand of minimalism and sophisticated restraint.

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SHOP: Midnorth Mercantile

Midnorth Mercantile, Mike's vintage shop and barber parlor was, quite frankly, my favorite place ever, and I made an effort to stop in frequently. Boasting an impressive collection of Schott perfecto jackets, saddle blankets, worn-in Wranglers, Gokey's boots, Mexican serapes and Woolrich 1970's  ski vests -- there was nothing for women, only racks and piles of my favorite thing -  RRL archive-worthy vintage menswear. Sometimes picking up a Dobbs wide-brimmed fedora, or a Pendleton flannel, or a perfectly tatty olive drab army jacket, I always found whatever I needed along with a hefty helping of  inspiration and conversation.

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Shop: Shinola

With the newest Shinola collaboration I've received my do-over.  Their varsity jacket (also available for men) was designed and fabricated with help from SF's Golden Bear Sportswear. An updated fit and a minimal S on the left breast, the piece toes the perfect line between Unionmade boyish and slim chic. How would you style it? I think it would be rad with an old high-waisted pair of 501's and some black ankle boots, or even a demure button-up and some bad-ass leather trousers.

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SHOP: MILL MERCANTILE AND FOG LINEN WORKS

If there is one store that just nails it every time with their curated seasonal collections, it is Mill Mercantile. The sister store to San Francisco's venerable Unionmade, Mill possesses the same ethos of stocking timeless, unassuming and elegant pieces. But while Unionmade's speciality are American-made provisions and heritage brands such as Ebbet's Field, Red Wing, LVC, Filson, and Quoddy, Mill is more globally-minded in the the brands they stock, with some of my favorites being  Japanese brands Kapital, Journal Standard, Blue Blue Japan, and Fog Linen Works.

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SHOP: Kyle Mueller of Austin's Sam Hill

While Muller's understanding of the apparel industry was growing in time with his appreciation for authentic Americana, it was meeting his then-girlfriend, now wife, who at the time worked for the RRL vintage archives, when Muller realized that a shop of his own -- filled with perfecto jackets, world war II bombers, and nubby 50’s crewneck sweaters --  was what he truly wanted. The duo, once wed, moved back to Austin. Muller took various graphic design work while continuing to fan his shopkeep flames in secret, planning and waiting until the day he could open a store of his own, Sam Hill began as a traveling pop-up, with stints at Helm Boots. The Sam Hill brick and mortar at 1710 E. 2nd Street opened two months ago.

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Shop: Mille

The Mille studio was the location for this April workshop, and the space adheres to mostKinfolk aesthetic stipulations, it being both understated, unassuming, and superbly, simplistically styled.

Owner Michelle LeBlanc is a self-described  'Army Brat' who moved around a lot before spending most of her formative years in Austin. Minnesota folk tend to settle here and stay, sometimes resulting in a slightly sleepy retail scene.  A shop-owner with an upbringing as exotic as, say, Texas is a welcome respite. Heidi Merrick anoraks, bags from Forestbound and Mansur Gavriel totes, wood thickets from Cheeriup and  pastel-colored ankle boots from Dieppa Restrepo -- everyone who enters wants to move in.

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